Sunday, July 24, 2011

Haji Ali Dargah, Worli Mumbai-Location,Introduction,History,Structure,What to see,Pictures,Video




Located: On an island off the coast in Worli, Mumbai
Built in: 1431
Attraction: Beautiful architecture, picturesque backdrop
How to Reach: One can easily reach Haji Ali by boarding buses or trains, or by hiring autos or taxis from the city.
Introduction:





The Haji Ali Dargah is a mosque and dargah (tomb) located on an islet off the coast of Worli in Southern part of Mumbai. Lying as it does in the heart of the city, the dargah is one of the most recognizable landmarks of Mumbai.
An exquisite example of Indian Islamic architecture, associated with legends about doomed lovers, the dargah contains the tomb of Sayed Peer Haji Ali Shah Bukhari.
Honoring the Muslim saint Haji Ali this mosque was built in the middle of the sea with only a narrow path leading to it giving it an ethereal look. As per the Muslim traditions separate praying rooms for ladies and gents are provided here to pay their respects. It is set 500 yards into the sea and can be reached only in low tide. The Haji Ali mausoleum has an offshore location, opposite the Mahalakshmi racecourse. During high tide, the connecting causeway is submerged in water giving the impression that the mosque and tomb are floating out at sea in splendid isolation. This is The Haji Ali Dargah, the floating tomb of a wealthy Mohammedan merchant who renounced his worldly ways before embarking on a pilgrimage to Mecca
History:


The Haji Ali Dargah was built by a wealthy Muslim merchant and saint named Haji Ali who renounced all his wordly possessions before making a pilgrimage to Mecca. The dargah was built in 1431.
Legend has it that Haji Ali died on his way to Mecca and his body, in its casket, floated back to Mumbai; however, some believe that Haji Ali drowned where the dargah stands today.
Structure:





The whitewashed structure occupies an area of 4,500 square metres, and an 85 foot (26 m) tower is the architectural highlight of the edifice. Behind the sculpted entrance, a marble courtyard contains the central shrine. The tomb within the mosque is covered by a brocaded red and green chaddar (tomb cover sheet). It is supported by an exquisite silver frame, supported by marble pillars. The main hall has marble pillars embellished with artful mirror work: blue, green, yellow chips of glass arranged in kaleidoscopic patterns interspersed with Arabic patterns which spell the ninety-nine names of Allah.
Today, most of the structure is corroded and the Dargah Trust is awaiting permission from the Central Government to raze the structure and rebuild it with Makrana marble, the same marble used to build the Taj Mahal. It was last repaired in the 1960s, but civil engineers say the structure is beyond further repair.





What to See:


2937883080104237032S600x600Q85.jpg image by roopeshtalwar


The Haji Ali Dargah sits 500 yards from the coast in the water of Worli Bay, near the neighbourhood of Worli. It is connected with the Hindu Mahalaxmi Temple via a small causeway, usually only accessible during low tide.
The whitewashed structure occupies an area of 4,500 metres, and 40,000 pilgrims visit the shrine on Thursdays and Fridays. An 85 foot (26 m) tower is the architectural highlight of the edifice.
Inside, the tomb is covered by a brocaded red and green chaddar (bedsheet). It is supported by an exquisite silver frome. The main hall has marble pillars embellished with coloured mirror work in blue, green, yellow chips and inscribed with the ninety-nine names of Allah.
As many as 40,000 pilgrims visit the shrine on Thursdays and Fridays. People from all faiths visit & pray at the dargah.
Video From Movie Fizza